Sworn translations

The Sworn Interpreters and Translators Act has been in force since 1 January 2009. That Act replaces old legislation on sworn translators and provides, among other things, that a large group of customers in the field of justice and the police must use sworn interpreters and translators in the context of criminal and immigration law. One of the instruments in the implementation of the Act is the Sworn Interpreters and Translators Register (the Register). All sworn interpreters and translators are listed in the Register.

_MG_7109_5586Since as far back as the 19th century, it has been obligatory for certain translations to be made by a sworn translator. This often applies to translations of documents with an official or legal status, such as deeds, documentary evidence in court cases, diplomas and certificates. If a translator produces a sworn translation, he or she places his or her signature, an official stamp and a statement that the translation is complete and faithful on the translation. His or her customer can then, if necessary, have the court verify on the basis of the signature whether the translation had actually been made by a sworn translator. That inspection is known as authentication.

I was sworn in as translator in 2000 before the ’s-Hertogenbosch District Court and have been in the Sworn Interpreters and Translators Register since 2009 under number 515. Each registration period of 5 years, 80 Continuing Education Credits need to be obtained in order to renew this registration. I do this by attending subject-matter translation courses and translator conferences.